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MOSCOW CULTURE - MOSCOW RUSSIA CULTURE

Moscow CultureMoscow Culture - Russia has often been called "A riddle wrapped in a mystery". Russian writers over the centuries have tried to portray the essence of Russians. There's virulent pride and humility, cold-blooded cruelty or biblical kindness, opulent wealth or frightening squalor. It seems like such extreme differences could exist, but in Russia they do. Pride is the one word that summarizes Russian values. Although they may have their share of problems, they are still proud of who they are as a people. They also love to dance in Moscow too.

Life has always been hard in Russia, and many consider suffering to be a virtue. It's not that Russians like to suffer, but they take pride in being tough. Smiles are not often seen on the faces of Muscovites. It's almost as if it's a cultural taboo to appear happy. If things are going well for Russians, they generally tend to keep their exuberance to themselves. They believe that undue optimism may "jinx" whatever good fortune they may be having in their lives at the time.

Art and Literature are taken very seriously in Russia. One of the ultimate insults in Russia is to implicate that someone lacks culture. There is a basic core of knowledge of certain names and events that is expected of every educated person. Those who fall short on the basics earn themselves the reputation of being called a Nekultury. In the eyes of the educated Muscovite there is hardly a lower class of human beings on the face of the planet.

For the outsider, there is a myriad of rules and regulations. There are many levels of belonging; neighbors verses strangers, Muscovites verses all other Russians, or Russians versus all others. The most important group is one's informal network of relatives, friends, and acquaintances. Friends can open doors that few would dare knock on. Russians don't know when and where they might call on their friends, but they do know that by building relationships they will not be left out in the cold in time of need.

 

MOSCOW RUSSIA