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MOSCOW TRANSPORT - MOSCOW TRANSPORT RUSSIA

Moscow TransportMoscow Transport - There are many different forms of transportation in Russia. Public transportation is popular in Moscow. The thing that can be said about the bus system is that is crosses the city very thoroughly. Riding the bus is cheap. It's the same fare to ride a short distance as it is to ride across town.

Tramway
The tramway (light rail that runs in a small section of Moscow) is faster and more reliable than buses. Tramways are usually less prone to traffic delays than buses. Most tramway stops are in the middle of the street. Beware that right of way belongs to the driver, not the pedestrian.

Trolley bus
Trolley buses run on overhead electricity. In off peak hours they can provide a convenient lift.

The Metro
The Moscow metro was ordered built by Stalin in 1931. By 1935, two of the main cross-town lines opened up. Today the metro has more than 126 miles of track and more than 120 stations.

Some of the marble walls and statues inside the metro make museums pale in comparison. The Moscow Metro is well planned, sometimes overcrowded, and cheap. You can ride all day on the metro for one fare as long as you don't leave the system.

There are 10 cross-town Metro Lines that make it easy to reach many different neighborhoods in Moscow. They are color coded for easy identification.

The layout of the metro matches the layout of the city, with a ring route around the city, and cross-town radial routes.

Taxis
Official yellow taxis roam all over Moscow. Taxisty (cabbies) are known for their greed and bad temper. Meters have known to be doctored, so you usually get a better deal with fixed fares. Fares are payable only in cash. Since passengers get routinely overcharged, tipping is not a common practice.

Driving a car
Driving a car in Moscow is a bit nerve-racking. Driving during the Soviet era was not difficult since not too many people had cars. Today jeeps, limousines, and fat Mercedes with dark windows suffocate the city with traffic jams and smog. Most drivers in Moscow do not use turn signals to change lanes. They just jump from lane to lane with reckless abandon. Roads have been the butt of a lot of Russian jokes. Moscow has tried to adapt to a rapid rise in traffic, but the accidents and endless traffic jams have become chronic. The condition of roads, because of sever climate, overcrowding, occasional drunk driving, and widespread disregard for traffic regulations make for dangerous conditions on the streets of Moscow.

 

MOSCOW RUSSIA